Starscapes — New Collection

It was Christmas week '66, and I didn't have any school. And like most kids, I was hoping to stay up later than my usual bedtime of 8 pm. My parents' bedroom was next door to mine and I had to pass it to get to anywhere else in the house. Papa had just checked to see that I was in bed, and lights went out. I wasn't there long before I could hear their television in the next room. It was the iconic opening song for Star Trek. 

I became spellbound. Between Lost In Space, The Time Tunnel, Star Trek, and the space race to the moon I became enthralled at the idea of traveling through space and time. As time passed, deep space probes like Voyager 1 and 2 began sending back close up photos of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, Uranus and galaxies far, far away. The giant telescopes Hubble, Spitzer and others captured photos of galaxies, nebula, and stars we'd never even imagined were out there. I recently saw some Hubble photos and was once again completely entranced by these images.

I was inspired to try to recreate these nebula and galaxies because they gave me such strong feelings of hope. They also made me feel incredibly small and insignificant. Full of fantastic colors, shapes, textures — a whirling mass of gases and heavenly bodies. I felt compelled to do this. The next thing I knew, I'd forgotten about seascapes and landscapes — I became caught up in "starscapes."

 

Starscapes

This is my newest collection. These paintings are my interpretation of the thousands of images of the galaxies, nebula, and heavenly bodies captured by the telescopes that the extraordinarily dedicated scientists at NASA and their associated labs have invented, built, and manage. It is an homage to their brilliance, passion, and curiosity. 

Because these are new, and smaller works, they are being launched with a special offer of 30% off for the holiday season.

This year there will be a total of 20 images, so check back often to see what other paintings I've added. Or sign up for my Art Alerts so you get alerted automatically whenever I add a new piece of art.